PART FOUR: TREATY MEDALS

PART FOUR: TREATY MEDALS

PART FOUR: TREATY MEDALS

RED SUN RISING When Canada commissioned the Montréal silversmith, Robert Hendry, they wish to depict a scene of equal stature of a Queen’s Councillors taking the Indian by the hand saying through treaties we are brothers. A stylized Indian encampment at sunset representing “As long as the shine shines and the grass grows.” As Treaties with

RED SUN RISING

When Canada commissioned the Montréal silversmith, Robert Hendry, they wish to depict a scene of equal stature of a Queen’s Councillors taking the Indian by the hand saying through treaties we are brothers. A stylized Indian encampment at sunset representing “As long as the shine shines and the grass grows.” As Treaties with Europeans are described this way since the time of Rotinonshón:ni (Five Nations) – Dutch Two Row Wampum Treaty, 1613 what is now upstate New York.

“You say that you are our Father and I am your son. We say, we will not be like Father and Son, but like Brothers. This wampum belt confirms our words. These two rows will symbolize two paths or two vessels, traveling down the same river together. One, a birch bark canoe, will be for the onkwehón:we, their laws, their customs and their ways. The other, a ship, will be for the white people and their laws, their customs and their ways. We shall each travel the river together, side by side, but in our boat. Neither of us will make compulsory laws or interfere in the internal affairs of the other. Neither of us will try to steer the other’s vessel.”

As long as the Sun shines upon this Earth, that is how long OUR Agreement will stand; Second, as long as the Water still flows; and Third, as long as the Grass Grows Green at a certain time of the year. Now we have Symbolized this Agreement and it shall be binding forever as long as Mother Earth is still in motion.” Rotinonshón:ni-Dutch Two Row Wampum Treaty, 1613

The Treaty of Niagara 1764 (The British/Western Great Lakes Confederacy Covenant Chain Wampum Belt). Great Council at Niagara in 1764 between the British Crown and at least twenty-four First Nations from across the Great Lakes region. After a month of negotiations — including the exchange of eighty-four wampum belts — the Treaty of Niagara was forged, extending the Silver Covenant Chain of Friendship into the heart of the continent and establishing a familial relationship between King George III and his descendants and First Nations peoples across the land. The purpose of the making of the Chain, as of any pact or Treaty between Nations, is to create the strength and protection that flow from unity in a common purpose.

At the heart of the Treaty of Niagara (as with most Treaties) is a relationship with the sovereign grounded in ties of kinship (not to make Indians subjects of the Crown). The dynamic created when the Crown and First Nations peoples became family entrenches the need for trust, honest communication, and honour. If familial love is woven into a Treaty relationship it allows for disagreement without disrespect.

We shall regard you therefore as a brother; and you may sleep in tranquilly, without fear of the Chipeways. As token of our friendship we present you with this pipe, to smoke.”

– The Ojibway Chief Minavavana, from west of Manitoulin at Michilimackinac, allied with Pontiac, in an address to the British 1764

TREATY MEDALS (1 – 11) 

DID YOU KNOW

1701 – The Great Peace of Montreal was a Peace Treaty representative from more than 20 Anishinaabe Nations assembled in Montreal for peace negotiations sponsored by the French Governor Louis-Hector de Callière, governor of New France. The Anishinaabe 3 Fires Confederacy & Iroquois Confederacy promised to “Bury the hachet” and live in peace after 100 years of conflict. The Great Circle of Peace was made on August 4, 1701, by Callière and 1200 representatives of 40 First Nations, that they enter into a peace treaty, to remain neutral in any future conflict between the English and French.

Again, “Bury the Hatchet” This phrase “to make peace” was used in 1759 by the Shawnee orator Missiweakiwa when it became obvious that the French war effort during the Seven Years’ War (French and Indian War) was collapsing. The Shawnees had sided with the French against the English, but now the Shawnee would “bury the bloody hatchet” with the English.

In the Treaty Medals the hatchet that is seen represents a different meaning. In the original treaty agreements, the sharing of land was agreed to be to the ‘depth of a plow.’ No more that.

When Canada commissioned the Treaty Medals they wish to depict a scene of a stylized Indian encampment at sunset. The message was that this is the sun in setting on the Indians and it is now the sunrise of the White men. What I know today that the secular rising and falling of the sun is for everyone and that the Red Sun Rising is our time now.

Miigwech!

White Spotted Horse, Anishinaabe, Treaty 2 Territory