PART THREE: TREATY MEDALS

PART THREE: TREATY MEDALS

PART THREE: TREATY MEDALS

THE TREATY MEDALS By 1872, the medals were seen as not impressive enough and to attempt to mollify the resentment, the government of Canada quickly commissioned the Montréal silversmith, Robert Hendry, to produce 25 replacement medals for the Chief’s of Treaty 1 & 2. The new Chief’s Medal of agriculture theme was now replaced by a

THE TREATY MEDALS

By 1872, the medals were seen as not impressive enough and to attempt to mollify the resentment, the government of Canada quickly commissioned the Montréal silversmith, Robert Hendry, to produce 25 replacement medals for the Chief’s of Treaty 1 & 2.

The new Chief’s Medal of agriculture theme was now replaced by a stylized Indian encampment at sunset, with an Indian leader in war costume and a British officer shaking hands. The inscription reads “INDIAN TREATY No.-/187-“. The date and treaty number would be inscribed at the time of signing.

While the size of the replacement medal was impressive, its thin silver plating, which easily wear off, was not. The Ojibway of Treaty One met with the northwestern Ontario Saulteaux warning them about the Treaty Commissioners falsehood and demonstrated how their Treaty Medals are flawed by smashing it.

Therefore, at last in 1873, when Canada was preparing to negotiate Treaty No. 3 with the Saulteaux peoples of what is now northwestern Ontario and eastern Manitoba, proper silver treaty medals were commissioned from the Wyons at a cost of $26 per medal and struck for distribution at the signing of Treaty No. 3 and eight further numbered treaty settlements that were negotiated up to 1921.

Next Part Four ‘RED SUN RISING’ I will write about the symbols on the Treaty Medal.

  • White Spotted Horse, Anishinaabe, Treaty 2 Territory